Is Aubergine a British word?

Why do British say aubergine?

The word aubergine, used in the UK, comes from French. The word eggplant, which Americans use, was popular in different parts of Europe because they were more used to seeing small, round, white versions that looked a bit like goose eggs.

Where does the word aubergine come from?

Originally it comes from India and Sri Lanka. The Latin/French term aubergine originally derives from the historical city of Vergina (Βεργίνα) in Greece. The aubergine eggplant is estimated to have reached Greek soils around 325 BC after the death of Alexander the Great in Babylon.

Which countries call eggplant aubergine?

In Britain, it is usually called an aubergine, a name which was borrowed through French and Catalan from its Arabic name al-badinjan.

Why do British say Aluminium?

It all began, apparently, when an indecisive British chemist by the name of Sir Humphrey Davy in fact coined the now archaic word “alumium” in 1808. However, referring to the element in his 1812 book Elements of Chemical Philosophy, he would use the word “aluminum”, much as Americans do today.

Is eggplant a fruit or vegetable?

What are the benefits of eating eggplant?

Eggplant has antioxidants like vitamins A and C, which help protect your cells against damage. It’s also high in natural plant chemicals called polyphenols, which may help cells do a better job of processing sugar if you have diabetes.

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